Santa Rosa Junior College
Santa Rosa Junior College logo Excellence in Education & Service
home >  Course Outlines
Course Outlines

10/23/2014 8:47:31 AMPOLS 18 Course Outline as of Fall 2011

Changed Course
CATALOG INFORMATION

Discipline and Nbr:  POLS 18Title:  POLITICAL THEORY  
Full Title:  Political Theory
Last Reviewed:5/2/2011

UnitsCourse Hours per Week Nbr of WeeksCourse Hours Total
Maximum3.00Lecture Scheduled3.0017.5Lecture Scheduled52.50
Minimum3.00Lab Scheduled0 Lab Scheduled0
 Contact DHR0 Contact DHR0
 Contact Total3.00 Contact Total52.50
 
 Non-contact DHR0 Non-contact Total0

Title 5 Category:  AA Degree Applicable
Grading:  Grade or P/NP
Repeatability:  00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP
Also Listed As: 
Formerly: 

Catalog Description:
Untitled document
An introduction to the history of Western political thought from Plato to the present. A survey of political writings from ancient, medieval and modern sources. Course topics include the evolution of Western political thought over the last 2,500 years; an examination of modern political ideologies (such as liberalism, conservatism, Marxism, and feminism); and an examination of the nature of justice and the relationship between the individual and the state.

Prerequisites:

Corequisites:

Recommended Preparation:
Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent

Limits on Enrollment:

Schedule of Classes Information
Description: Untitled document
An introduction to the history of Western political thought from Plato to the present. A survey of political writings from ancient, medieval and modern sources. Course topics include the evolution of Western political thought over the last 2,500 years; an examination of modern political ideologies (such as liberalism, conservatism, Marxism, and feminism); and an examination of the nature of justice and the relationship between the individual and the state.
(Grade or P/NP)

Prerequisites:
Recommended:Eligibility for ENGL 1A or equivalent
Limits on Enrollment:
Transfer Credit:CSU;UC.
Repeatability:00 - Two Repeats if Grade was D, F, NC, or NP

ARTICULATION, MAJOR, and CERTIFICATION INFORMATION

Associate Degree:Effective:Fall 1981
Inactive: 
 Area:D
Social and Behavioral Sciences
 
CSU GE:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 DSocial ScienceFall 1997
 D8Political Science, Govt, Legal Instutns  
 
IGETC:Transfer Area Effective:Inactive:
 4Social and Behavioral ScienceFall 1981
 4HPolitical Science:Govt and Legal Instutn  
 
CSU Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
UC Transfer:TransferableEffective:Fall 1981Inactive:
 
CAN:

Certificate/Major Applicable: Major Applicable Course


COURSE CONTENT

Student Learning Outcomes:
Untitled document
Upon successful completion of this course, students should be able to:
1. Identify the major issues raised in political theory.
2. Discuss the core contributions made by major political thinkers.
3. Trace the evolution of political ideas over time by comparing and contrasting the writings of major political thinkers.
4. Apply the concepts covered in political theory to contemporary political issues.
5. Critically analyze and write about the fundamental questions raised by political theorists.

Objectives: Untitled document
Upon completion of the course, students will be able to:
1.  Outline the historical development of Western political thought from
   ancient Greece to the present.
2.  Compare and contrast the "world views" held by political philosophers
   within the ancient, medieval and modern traditions.
3.  Identify the core concepts and contributions of thinkers such as
   Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Mill
   and Marx.
4.  Compare and contrast modern political ideologies, such as liberalism,
   conservatism, Marxism and feminism.
5.  Apply the perspectives of thinkers from
   different eras to contemporary political problems.
6.  Utilize research skills commonly found in the Social Sciences.
7.  Examine how different societies and social subgroups (such as
   economic classes and religious groups) interact with one another
   during the Ancient, Medieval and Modern eras within the Western
   tradition.

Topics and Scope
Untitled document
1.  Introducing Political Theory
     a. The scope and purpose of the course
     b. Methodology and research skills
     c. Situating Political Theory within the discipline of Political
        Science--comparison and contrast with other fields of study
2.  The Nature of Politics and Development of Political Thought.
     a. Classical Era
     b. Medieval Era
     c. Modern Era
3.  Classical Political Thought
     a. Historical setting in Ancient Greece
     b. Plato
     c. Aristotle
4.  Medieval Political Thought
     a. The Emergence of Christianity in Europe
     b. Catholic Theorists (Augustine, Aquinas, et. al.)
     c. Protestant Theorists (Luther, Calvin, et. al)
5.  Modern Political Thought
     a. A Shift in the Medieval Paradigm
     b. Machiavelli
     c. Hobbes
6.  The Rise of Liberalism
     a. The Emergence of Individual Rights
     b. Locke
     c. Smith
     d. The Federalists
     e. Mill
7.  The Conservative Reaction
     a. The Spread of Democracy
     b. Burke
     c. Tocqueville
8. The Communitarian Response to Liberalism--Rousseau
9. The Emergence of Capitalism and the Socialist Response
    a.  Marx
    b.  Communism and Socialism in Theory and Practice Since Marx
10. Other Critiques of Modern Liberal Society
     a.  Nietzsche's critique
     b.  Fascism and Nazism
     c.  Postmodernism
     d.  Feminism
      e.  Environmentalism  
11. Political Theory Today
     a. Contemporary Theorists (Rawls, Nozick, communitarians)
     b. Theory, Ideology and the World Today

Assignments:
Untitled document
1.  Read and study appropriate chapters in the textbooks (approximately 40-80 pages per week).
2.  Regular attendance and extensive note taking in class is expected and assumed.
3.  Preparation for two in-class, closed book, no notes essay exams.  One of these exams would be a final.
4.  Participate in in-class discussion and readings.
5.  Complete term paper approx. 8-10 pages long.
6.  Written Homework.

Methods of Evaluation/Basis of Grade.
Writing: Assessment tools that demonstrate writing skill and/or require students to select, organize and explain ideas in writing.Writing
25 - 40%
Written homework, Term paper
Problem solving: Assessment tools, other than exams, that demonstrate competence in computational or non-computational problem solving skills.Problem Solving
0 - 10%
Problem-based learning demonstrations
Skill Demonstrations: All skill-based and physical demonstrations used for assessment purposes including skill performance exams.Skill Demonstrations
0 - 0%
None
Exams: All forms of formal testing, other than skill performance exams.Exams
60 - 70%
Multiple choice, Essay Exams
Other: Includes any assessment tools that do not logically fit into the above categories.Other Category
0 - 10%
Participation in class discussion, class presentations

STUDENTS PLEASE NOTE: DO NOT BUY TEXTBOOKS before checking with the SRJC Bookstore.
These titles are representative only, and may not be the same ones used in your class.
Check availability and pricing.


Representative Textbooks:
Untitled document

Primary Sources:
 
Ideals and Ideologies:  A Reader, 8th ed.  Ball, Terence and Dagger, Richard.  Longman Publishing:  2010
 
Princeton Readings in Political Thought:  Essential Texts Since Plato.   Cohen, Mitchell and Fermon, Nicole eds.  Princeton University Press: 1996.  (Classic)
 
Secondary Sources:
 
Inventor of Ideas:  An Introduction to Western Political Philosophy, 2nd ed.  Tannenbaum, Donald and Schultz, David.  Wadswoth Cengage Learning:  2003
 
Political Ideologies and the Democratic Ideal, 8th ed.  Ball, Terence and Dagger, Richard.  Longman Publishing:  2010
 
Political Questions:  Political Philosophy from Plato to Rawls, 3rd ed.   Arnhart, Larry.  Waveland Press, Inc.:  2002
 
Political Thinking, Political Theory, and Civil Society, 3rd ed.  DeLue, Steven M and Dale, Timothy M.  Longman:  2008
 
Political Thinking:  The Perennial Questions, 6th ed.  Tinder, Glenn.  Longman:  2003
 
Political Thought:  A Guide to the Classics, ed. 1.  Bagby, Laurie M.  Wadsworth Cengage Learning:  2001
 
Reconstructing the Classics:  Political Theory from Plato to Marx, 3rd ed.  Portis, Edward Bryan.  Chatham House Publishers/Seven Bridges Press, LLC:  2007
 
World History of Ancient Political Thought.  Black, Antony.  Oxford:  2009

Print PDF